mapping cyberspace
Martin Dodge & Rob Kitchin
 
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Reviews and Press

Review by Joshua Lepawsky in Cultural Geographies, 2002, Vol. 9, pages 483-485.

"... overall Mapping Cyberspace is a strong text. The book provides a clear and broad introduction to major theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues related to cyberspace research. Mapping Cyberspace is a critical first stop for any researcher interested in contributing new knowledge in this exciting emerging field." (page 485)

The full review is available (pdf format).

 

Review by Christine Hine in Sociology, August 2002, Vol. 36, No. 3, pages 776-778.

"Dodge and Kitchin's Mapping Cyberspace is an intriguing read, with a usefulness to readers well beyond the primary audience of (cyber)geographers. The early review chapters cover a wide territory of literature relating to the development of the internet and of cyberstudies, which serves as a clear and coherent introduction to the field." (page 776)

 

Review by Robert Latham in International Studies Review, Spring 2002, Vol. 4, No. 1, pages 101-115.

"Dodge and Kitchin's book serves to convey in detail how cyberspace is conceived as space and how geographers will begin to approach this subject." (page 114)

 

Review by Darren Purcell in Progress in Human Geography, 2002, Vol. 26, No. 4, pages 575-576.

"Dodge and Kitchin provide a strong contribution to the growing literature in geography and cyberspace, charting multiple areas to which scholars im many subdisciplines of geography may contribute."

The full review is available (pdf format).

 

Review by Robert Lloyd in the International Journal of Geographical Information Science, May 2002, Vol. 16, No. 3, pages 302-303.

Read the full review (pdf format)

The full review is available (pdf format).

 

Review by William J Mitchell in Environment and Planning A, February 2002, Vol. 34, No. 2, pages 369-370.

Read the full review (pdf format)

The full review is available (pdf format).

 

Review by David Maguire in Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, March 2002, Vol. 29, pages 308-309.

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The full review is available (pdf format).

 

Review by Denise Pumain in CYBERGEO, 26/02/02.

"The work has three main virtues: it gathers together and organizes a considerable quantity of information and cartographic documents related to the new technologies of information and communication; it analyses this information and offers a synthesis of the lines of research proposed in this decidedly ‘new’ geography.

(The full review is available. Also, a local pdf format version.)

 

Review by Barney Warf in The Geographical Journal, December 2001, vol. 167, no. 4, pages 381-382.

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(Click here to read page 381 and page 382 of the review.)

 

Review by James O. Wheeler in Urban Geography, 2001, Vol. 22, No. 6, page 604.

 

Read the full review Review by David Unwin in Geography, July 2001, Vol. 86, No. 3, page 269.

The full review is available.

 

Sistema Terra, December 2000, vol. IX, no. 1-3, page 159.

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(Click to read the full the review.) 

 

Review by Peter H. Salus in Matrix News, Issue 11.1, January 2001.

Cybercartography

Mapping Cyberspace is a brilliant attempt at grappling with the the representation of what has been called cyberspace. I say representation because Dodge and Kitchin are not merely geographers or cartographers. They are also concerned with the socio-cultural concepts that Baudrillard (or Greimas or Derrida) would endorse.

(Click here to read the whole review.)

 

Review by Menno-Jan Kraak in Geoinformatics Magazine, March 2001.

Mapping Cyberspace

The title of this book, Mapping Cyberspace, is intriguing. Cyberspace, defined in the book as "referring to the conceptual space within ICT rather than technology itself", opens up a whole new realm for the mapping and geographical sciences.

(Click here for a scan of the whole page review.)

  

c't Magazine, no. 4, 4/01, page 244

 

Der Spiegel, no. 33, 14/8/00, page 161

 

Reviews Amazon.co.uk

The study of cyberspace crosses intellectual and academic boundaries, encompassing geography, cartography, sociology, studies of culture, communications, even literary theory and cognitive psychology. Researcher and computer technician Martin Dodge and geographer Rob Kitchin have put their collective experience together to produce a volume (and matching Web site: www.MappingCyberspace.com) examining how visually to represent this new space in which we now spend so much of our time.

Other writers--William Gibson, Neal Stephenson and Pat Cadigan, to name but a few--have explored this subject in a speculative, fictional way, but this is largely tough, academic stuff, everything from mapping techniques to "the spatial cognition of cyberspace" with a little critical theory thrown in for bad measure.

The two started with Dodge's Web site www.cybergeography.org/atlas and meant to create a coffee-table book, but found it "mutated into a book concerned solely with the spatialities and geometries of cyberspace" and then to it's present, somewhat dry form.

It shows. You can't help feeling the book would have benefited from fewer words and more pictures; the authors have obviously read Tufte's Envisioning Information but could apply his insights better. Nevertheless, it's a good introduction to an activity so challenging one source calls it "more formidable than that faced by the sea captains of the past". --Liz Bailey

< http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0415198844/ >

 

HannaHodge User Experience Architects UXblog
Tuesday, December 12, 2000

Mapping Cyberspace

We haven't seen the book yet, but judging by the site, Martin Dodge and Rob Kitchin's Mapping Cyberspace is worth a look. For all the talk in the industry about navigation and information architecture, there are ideas here that could still use more hype. For instance, "sometimes structure *is* content." The landscape as a whole can be as interesting and informative as any of the places on the map. Check out the gallery for a lot of inspiring scenery. We're not sure much of this is ready for direct application to the workaday web; a lot of it was created for very narrow or specialized audiences. But it's great to have all this material in one place. It reminds us that it's possible to fit a *lot* of information in a single view, and that there are new exciting ruts for us to get stuck in well beyond the "sites and pages" metaphor. We also like the fact that Dodge and Kitchin draw attention to the social interactions that take place on this new landscape. Not pages, places. Not interactions with pages, but interactions in and through places, social exchanges shaped by place.

 

Making maps of cyberspace
by Giles Turnbull

WriteTheWeb interview from the 21st November 2000

 

"This is an excellent,innovative and thought-provoking book. It does a valuable service to the discipline of geography by demonstrating most effectively that even in cyberspace, geography still matters."
Andy Gillespie, University of Newcastle

"This book displays enormous work and a depth of knowledge that will be invaluable to the researcher, student and the interested lay reader."
Mike Crang, University of Durham

"A bold undertaking that contributes significantly to geography's understanding of the multiple facets of cyberspace." Francis Harvey, University of Kentucky

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

(c) 2002 Martin Dodge and Rob Kitchin